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:''This article is about the British automobile. To see the article on the American Star Car Company, go to [[wikipedia:Star (automobile)|Star (automobile)]].''
 
:''This article is about the British automobile. To see the article on the American Star Car Company, go to [[wikipedia:Star (automobile)|Star (automobile)]].''
   
{{Infobox company
 
| name = Star Motor Company
 
| logo =
 
| caption =
 
| type =
 
| fate =
 
| predecessor =
 
| successor = [[McKenzie and Denley]]
 
| foundation = 1898
 
| founder = Lisle family
 
| defunct = 1932
 
| location =
 
| locations =
 
| location_city = Wolverhampton
 
| location_country = [[England]]
 
| area_served =
 
| key_people =
 
| industry =
 
| products = [[automobile]]s
 
| production =
 
| services =
 
| owner =
 
| num_employees =
 
| parent = [[Guy Motors]]
 
| divisions =
 
| subsid =
 
| homepage =
 
| footnotes =
 
}}
 
 
[[Image:Star 11 9 1922.jpg|right|250px|thumb|1922 Star 11.9 saloon]]
 
[[Image:Star 11 9 1922.jpg|right|250px|thumb|1922 Star 11.9 saloon]]
The '''Star Motor Company''' was a British car and commercial vehicle maker based in Wolverhampton and active from 1898 to 1932. They started out as a Bicycle manufacturer and were taken over by [[Guy Motors]] in 1928. The manufacturing of cars ceased in 1932.
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The '''Star Motor Company''' was a British car and commercial vehicle maker based in Wolverhampton and active from 1898 to 1932. They started out as a Bicycle manufacturer and were taken over by [[Guy Motors]] in 1928. The manufacture of cars ceasing in 1932.
   
 
==History==
 
==History==
 
Star was founded by the Lisle family who like many other vehicle makers started by making bicycles, in their case in 1893 as ''Sharratt and Lisle''. In 1896 this was changed to the ''Star Cycle Company''.<ref name=Beaulieu>{{cite book |last=Georgano |first=N. |title=Beaulieu Encyclopedia of the Automobile |year=2000 |publisher=HMSO |location=London |isbn=1-57958-293-1}}</ref>
 
Star was founded by the Lisle family who like many other vehicle makers started by making bicycles, in their case in 1893 as ''Sharratt and Lisle''. In 1896 this was changed to the ''Star Cycle Company''.<ref name=Beaulieu>{{cite book |last=Georgano |first=N. |title=Beaulieu Encyclopedia of the Automobile |year=2000 |publisher=HMSO |location=London |isbn=1-57958-293-1}}</ref>
   
The first car was made in 1898 and a separate company, the Star Motor Company, was registered as a wholly owned subsidiary of '''Star Engineering Ltd.''' The early vehicles were heavily influenced by existing car makers and the 1898 '''3.5''' was essentially a single cylinder {{convert|3.5|hp|abbr=on}} Benz and often called the '''Star-Benz'''; it had two speeds, chain drive, wire spoke wheels, [[acetylene]] lighting, electric ignition, and [[Clipper (tire company)|Clipper]] [[pneumatic tire]]s standard, for [[Pound sterling|₤]]189.<ref name=star>Wise, David Burgess. “Star: W’hampton’s Bright Lights”, in Northey, Tom, ed. ''World of Automobiles'' (London: Orbis Publishing, 1974), Volume 19, pp.2161.</ref> One a week was being made in 1899,<ref name=Beaulieu/> and in the first year, they made their first export sale, to [[Auckland, New Zealand]].<ref>Wise, ''op. cit.'', p.2162.</ref> In 1900, production had expanded to facilities in Dudley Road and Nelson, Stewart, Ablow, and Dobb Streets, with output of twenty a week.<ref name=star/> A two-cylinder three-speed model appeared that year, also, at the Richmond Automobile Club Show. Encouraged by founder [[Edward Lisle]], they were also being entered in the [[1000 Miles' Trial]] (where it proved fragile), along with "every test or competition for which they were eligible".<ref name=star/> In 1901, the '''7''' and '''10''' with vertical twin [[De Dion]] engines and in 1902 a four cylinder '''20hp''' appeared. In 1903, copying the leading maker, [[Mercedes (car)|Mercedes]], Star introduced a {{convert|12|hp|abbr=on}} four, and set a record of 39&nbsp;mph (63&nbsp;km/h) on a 2&nbsp;mile (3.2&nbsp;km) run in [[County Cork]], [[Ireland]], under the auspices of the [[Irish Automobile Club]]. In addition, two Stars ran in the [[Isle of Man]] qualifying races for the [[Gordon Bennett Cup]]; neither 10 litre car made it.<ref name=star/> From 1904 only four cylinder models were made.
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The first car was made in 1898 and a separate company, the Star Motor Company, was registered as a wholly owned subsidiary of Star Engineering Ltd. The early vehicles were heavily influenced by existing car makers and the 1898 '''3.5''' was essentially a single cylinder {{convert|3.5|hp|abbr=on}} Benz and often called the '''Star-Benz'''; it had two speeds, chain drive, wire spoke wheels, [[acetylene]] lighting, electric ignition, and [[Clipper (tire company)|Clipper]] [[pneumatic tire]]s standard, for [[Pound sterling|₤]]189.<ref name=star>Wise, David Burgess. “Star: W’hampton’s Bright Lights”, in Northey, Tom, ed. ''World of Automobiles'' (London: Orbis Publishing, 1974), Volume 19, pp.2161.</ref> One a week was being made in 1899,<ref name=Beaulieu/> and in the first year, they made their first export sale, to [[Auckland, New Zealand]].<ref>Wise, ''op. cit.'', p.2162.</ref> In 1900, production had expanded to facilities in Dudley Road and Nelson, Stewart, Ablow, and Dobb Streets, with output of twenty a week.<ref name=star/> A two-cylinder three-speed model appeared that year, also, at the Richmond Automobile Club Show. Encouraged by founder [[Edward Lisle]], they were also being entered in the [[1000 Miles' Trial]] (where it proved fragile), along with "every test or competition for which they were eligible".<ref name=star/> In 1901, the '''7''' and '''10''' with vertical twin [[De Dion]] engines and in 1902 a four cylinder '''20hp''' appeared. In 1903, copying the leading maker, [[Mercedes (car)|Mercedes]], Star introduced a {{convert|12|hp|abbr=on}} four, and set a record of 39&nbsp;mph (63&nbsp;km/h) on a 2&nbsp;mile (3.2&nbsp;km) run in [[County Cork]], [[Ireland]], under the auspices of the [[Irish Automobile Club]]. In addition, two Stars ran in the [[Isle of Man]] qualifying races for the [[Gordon Bennett Cup]]; neither 10 litre car made it.<ref name=star/> From 1904 only four cylinder models were made.
   
 
For 1906, there was a new 3261&nbsp;cc (200&nbsp;ci) 14 hp four,<ref name=star/> as well as a new six, the 6227&nbsp;cc (380&nbsp;ci) 30 hp; the six, increased in [[engine displacement|displacement]] to 6981&nbsp;cc (426&nbsp;ci) in 1909, lasted until 1911.<ref name=star/> The main Star company continued to make well engineered models up to the outbreak of war in 1914 adding a range of vans and trucks to the output and became one of the six largest British car makers.<ref name=Beaulieu/>
 
For 1906, there was a new 3261&nbsp;cc (200&nbsp;ci) 14 hp four,<ref name=star/> as well as a new six, the 6227&nbsp;cc (380&nbsp;ci) 30 hp; the six, increased in [[engine displacement|displacement]] to 6981&nbsp;cc (426&nbsp;ci) in 1909, lasted until 1911.<ref name=star/> The main Star company continued to make well engineered models up to the outbreak of war in 1914 adding a range of vans and trucks to the output and became one of the six largest British car makers.<ref name=Beaulieu/>
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Oblivious to the lessons of standardization, Star in 1926 offered a 2120&nbsp;cc (129ci) 14/40 OHV four, a similar 3181&nbsp;cc (194ci) 20/60 six, and three sidevalve designs, all in several body styles.<ref name=star/>
 
Oblivious to the lessons of standardization, Star in 1926 offered a 2120&nbsp;cc (129ci) 14/40 OHV four, a similar 3181&nbsp;cc (194ci) 20/60 six, and three sidevalve designs, all in several body styles.<ref name=star/>
   
In 1928, Edward Lisle sold the company to [[Guy Motors]], also based in Wolverhampton, who wanted to add a range of cars to their heavy vehicle production. Production was moved to a new plant in Bushbury on the Wolverhampton northern outskirts near the [[Clyno]] factory. From here came the new 18/50, a 2470&nbsp;cc (ci) six, with wet cylinder liners, [[duralumin]] [[connecting rod]]s, aluminium [[piston]]s, seven [[bearing (mechanical)|bearing]] [[crankshaft]], which in 1930 were redone as the '''Comet''' and '''Planet'''.<ref name=star/> They proved uneconomical and unprofitable, and production was stopped in March 1932,<ref name=star/> remaining cars and spares sold off to [[McKenzie and Denley]] (Birmingham), which continued to have Star cars and [[new old stock|NOS]] parts catalogued in 1962.<ref name=star/>
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In 1928, Edward Lisle sold the company to [[Guy Motors]], also based in Wolverhampton, who wanted to add a range of cars to their heavy vehicle production. Production was moved to a new plant in Bushbury on the Wolverhampton northern outskirts near the [[Clyno]] factory. From here came the new 18/50, a 2470&nbsp;cc (ci) six, with wet cylinder liners, [[duralumin]] [[connecting rod]]s, aluminium [[piston]]s, seven [[bearing (mechanical)|bearing]] [[crankshaft]], which in 1930 were redone as the '''Comet''' and '''Planet'''.<ref name=star/> They proved uneconomical and unprofitable, and production was stopped in March 1932,<ref name=star/> remaining cars and spares sold off to McKenzie and Denley (Birmingham), which continued to have Star cars and [[new old stock|NOS]] parts catalogued in 1962.<ref name=star/>
   
 
==Star cars (main models)==
 
==Star cars (main models)==
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